Come join the KBR family and let us put the "Dream" into your next dive vacation

Safety

Safety is always of the utmost importance to us and we provide a great level of support to our clients: All of our Indonesian guides are trained by KBR to PADI standards All guides are trained in Emergency First Response, to provide care in an emergency We carry oxygen in our center and train our staff to administer it We offer Nitrox* and the PADI Enriched Air Specialty to reduce nitrogen uptake We have access to an excellent recompression chamber 90 minutes drive away in Manado. In the event of an emergency you can be certain that resort staff will look after you and accompany you * surcharged

Conservation

We are very committed to conservation, to help sustain the livelihoods of our local community. We sponsor various conservation activities, just a few example being: School marine conservation education program Regular beach clean-ups Rubbish collection campaign Kungkungan Bay has limited its room capacity, specifically to minimize the impact of divers on this relatively unexplored area of the ocean. However, as the Lembeh Strait has been discovered by divers from all over the world, our efforts to minimize environmental impact are not enough on its own. Kungkungan Bay Resort fully supports the efforts, goals and methods of the North Sulawesi Watersports Association (NSWA) and urges you to support its efforts. Since its inception Kungkungan Bay Resort has supported the NSWA with funding and assistance in formulating a set of by-laws for dive operations using the strait.

Environmental Responsibility

We promote environmental responsibility and awareness for our staff and guests: We follow the Lembeh Straits policy of not allowing gloves when diving (unless there is a certified medial condition) We promote a no-touching policy We encourage frog-kicking rather than fin-kicking to cut down disturbing the sand. We dive in small groups, 4-guests-per-guide, for more environmental control We can provide check-out dives to iron out the buoyancy wrinkles Discover Scuba Dives for uncertified divers are only conducted in the pool and on sandy areas of reefs We recycle paper in our office and always aim to reduce our usage We use energy-saving light bulbs and switch off all office equipment when not in use

Lembeh Strait Dive Site Map

(Click on a numbered marker to see information about that site.)

Some say that Lembeh Strait is the Best Muck Diving place in the World! It is a real paradise for underwater macro photography and for all the critter lovers. Scuba diving in Lembeh is like jumping into a world of tiny strange and weird creatures. Famous photographers and enthusiastic divers come from all over the world to dive this famous spot and discover this incredible biodiversity

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Police Pier

Is a muck dive south of KBR. A gradual sandy slope runs from the shallows. The bottom is covered with patches of sponges and rubble that conceal thorny seahorses and frogfish. They blend in well with their habitat but our guides are experts at finding them.

Nudi Falls

Is a beautiful miniwall that gives way to a sand and rubble slope. This site is well known for it's variety of nudibranchs, comet fish and pygmy seahorses.

KBR House Reef

To the right of the pier in the shallows is a patch reef that is great for hunting critters. To the left of the pier are massive stands of anchor coral followed by large coral heads with gorgonians and sea whips. Pygmy Seahorses are sometimes found around 18m/60’. On your way back don't forget to check under the pier where juvenile batfish and yellow lionfish have been seen. The currents can be quite strong here at times so check with the dive guides before you dive.

Aer Prang

Means War-water. Just after WWI, a passing warship blasted a hole in the rocks to get at the fresh water, hence the name. The sandy bottom is dotted with patches of elegance coral which is teeming with commensal shrimp and crab life, while the sand is home to many unusual critters like snake eels, fingered dragonettes, seahorses and robust pipefish. At night, stargazers and bubble shells have been spotted. We have found Rhinopius scorpionfish on this site.

Aer Prang

Means War-water. Just after WWI, a passing warship blasted a hole in the rocks to get at the fresh water, hence the name. The sandy bottom is dotted with patches of elegance coral which is teeming with commensal shrimp and crab life, while the sand is home to many unusual critters like snake eels, fingered dragonettes, seahorses and robust pipefish. At night, stargazers and bubble shells have been spotted. We have found Rhinopius scorpionfish on this site.

Aer Prang

Means War-water. Just after WWI, a passing warship blasted a hole in the rocks to get at the fresh water, hence the name. The sandy bottom is dotted with patches of elegance coral which is teeming with commensal shrimp and crab life, while the sand is home to many unusual critters like snake eels, fingered dragonettes, seahorses and robust pipefish. At night, stargazers and bubble shells have been spotted. We have found Rhinopius scorpionfish on this site.

Jahir

One of our sites named after the dive guides that discovered it. Another great muck site with lots of Purple Heart urchin’s home to the beautiful Zebra crab. Ambon scorpionfish are regulars along with tiny frogfish and many eels. Nighttime gives a good opportunity to see the strange stargazer.

Jahir

One of our sites named after the dive guides that discovered it. Another great muck site with lots of Purple Heart urchin’s home to the beautiful Zebra crab. Ambon scorpionfish are regulars along with tiny frogfish and many eels. Nighttime gives a good opportunity to see the strange stargazer.

Makawide

A gradual slope which is a great place to find lots of different kinds of sand dweller's including the shrimp goby and dragonettes. The depths have lots of sea whips where black coral crabs and shrimps make their home. Pygmy seahorses have been spotted around 30m/90'.

Makawide

A gradual slope which is a great place to find lots of different kinds of sand dweller's including the shrimp goby and dragonettes. The depths have lots of sea whips where black coral crabs and shrimps make their home. Pygmy seahorses have been spotted around 30m/90'.

Nudi Retreat

Is a small-protected cove along the Sulawesi coast. The reef slope starts in only 3m/10' of water and gradually works its way deeper. A colorful wall abuts the slope in the shallows. It has resident cockatoo wasp fish, and a pair of Pegasus sea moths. Frogfish often put in an appearance and on night dives a coral cat shark can be seen. A good place for pygmy seahorses.

Nudi Retreat

Is a small-protected cove along the Sulawesi coast. The reef slope starts in only 3m/10' of water and gradually works its way deeper. A colorful wall abuts the slope in the shallows. It has resident cockatoo wasp fish, and a pair of Pegasus sea moths. Frogfish often put in an appearance and on night dives a coral cat shark can be seen. A good place for pygmy seahorses.

Magic Rock

A small fringing reef leads to patch reefs and coral heads at 11m/35'. The site takes its name from the small rock that teems with life, ribbon eels; pearl-eyed morays, sweepers, leaf fish and devilfish have been seen. The shallows are a good place to spot large cuttlefish.

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Teluk Kembahu

Named after the village in the bay is another gentle sand slope with a great chance of seeing many different types of pipefish, from ornate to robust, also in the sand stargazers and devilfish have been seen.

Teluk Kembahu

Named after the village in the bay is another gentle sand slope with a great chance of seeing many different types of pipefish, from ornate to robust, also in the sand stargazers and devilfish have been seen.

Teluk Kembahu

Named after the village in the bay is another gentle sand slope with a great chance of seeing many different types of pipefish, from ornate to robust, also in the sand stargazers and devilfish have been seen.

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Hairball

A true "Muck" site that is home to some of our most unusual critters. There are no corals, only black sand, algae and an occasional patch of sponges. Some of the critters found here grow skin filaments to blend in with the algae, often seen are frogfish, Ambon scorpionfish, snake eels, devilfish, dragonettes and even the flamboyant cuttlefish.

Hairball

A true "Muck" site that is home to some of our most unusual critters. There are no corals, only black sand, algae and an occasional patch of sponges. Some of the critters found here grow skin filaments to blend in with the algae, often seen are frogfish, Ambon scorpionfish, snake eels, devilfish, dragonettes and even the flamboyant cuttlefish.

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Aw Shucks

Is a patch reef near one of the pearl farms along the Sulawesi Coast, The mushroom corals here sometimes have the tiny commensal white pipefish. A seemingly endless sand slope can hold surprises like devilfish, nudibranchs and snake eels.

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Jiko Yanse

This is our Northern most site and often has the clearest water. This is a steep reef slope filled with beautiful soft corals, pygmy seahorse, sea fans and sponges.

California Dreaming

On the northern coast of Lembeh Island so visibility is usually good. The area is full of gorgonians, sea fans and brilliant orange tree corals that bloom when the current is running. Giant green frogfish have been seen and there are plenty of fish. A shallow plateau at 13m/40’ is a great place for hunting unusual critters.

Pulau Putus

On the Northern end of Lembeh is a steep reef that gives way to a sand slope at 26m/80'. A very pretty site with good visibility and lots of fish life. You can we see the shy jaw fish on a sand slope by the mooring.

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